Skip to content

Spam and Newton

February 23, 2011

Tonight, I was typing an email when one of those Daemon/wrong address messages popped up in my inbox. I hadn’t sent anyone anything: what was this? To my horror, I discovered that my email had just sent spam to everyone in my address book. I apologize to all of you. I’ve changed my password, my security questions, and eaten an entire container of chocolate chip ice cream, but I am not sure that this has stopped the spam. Do let me know if you are getting peppered by my emails. I do not like evenings like this where somehow I am ending more behind than when I began. The only bright spot was when my son and I watched “Newton’s Dark Secrets” — thank you public television. Did you know that Newton thought the idea of the trinity diluted the idea of the one true god? My son said, “He’s Jewish!.” That is not quite accurate, but he was certainly not a traditional 17th century Christian. He also thought the world would end in 2060. He may be right about that. The actor who played Newton (this was part re-enactment) was strangely hyperbolic. Like a poorly trained Shakesperian wannabe. But then, poor man, how do you “play” Newton? In this case, you gaze out the windows with your eyes trained on something invisible to mortal eyes: distant planets? falling objects? prisms? And you also scribble numbers down in an old leather book or read from this same leather book. My son found him unconvincing. I found him deeply moving. Probably, he (the real Newton, not the actor) would have known how to stop my spam problem.

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: